Last edited by Kern
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

6 edition of Rum, slaves, and molasses found in the catalog.

Rum, slaves, and molasses

the story of New England"s triangular trade.

by Clifford Lindsey Alderman

  • 356 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Crowell-Collier Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New England,
  • America,
  • Africa, West
    • Subjects:
    • Slave-trade -- America -- Juvenile literature,
    • Slave-trade -- Africa, West -- Juvenile literature,
    • Slave trade,
    • New England -- Commerce -- Juvenile literature

    • About the Edition

      Describes the acquisition, transport, and fate of the Africans who fell victim to New England"s slave trade with the West Indies in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

      Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. [121]-124.

      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHT1049 .A4
      The Physical Object
      Pagination127 p.
      Number of Pages127
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5710286M
      LC Control Number70188772

      Exchange of rum, slaves, and molasses between the North American colonies, Africa, and the West Indies. A small but immensely profitable subset of the Atlantic trade. It was infamously profitable.   Jefferson announces that he has decided to free his slaves, and Rutledge accuses the northern colonies of hypocrisy: the northern shippers may not own slaves, but they get rich off of the trade of slaves. He reminds them that the process of Molasses to Rum to .

        The Woodford Theatre in Versailles Kentucky presents A view into how New England profited from the Caribbean molasses trade which was based on transported African slavery.

      Sugar, Molasses, and RumThe sugarcane, native to Southeast Asia, saccharum officinarium L, is a stout, tall perennial grass averaging 10 to 12 feet. The plant was developed in Neolithic times and was dispersed to the Middle East and Mediterranean regions before it made its greatest impact in the New World in an island-hopping trail. Source for information on Sugar, Molasses, and Rum: History. According to Ian Williams in his book, “Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of ,” Sir John Summer and his crew turned to alcohol and the making of alcohol for comfort.


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Rum, slaves, and molasses by Clifford Lindsey Alderman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rum, Slaves and Molasses Hardcover – January 1, out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Hardcover $ 4 Used 5/5(1). Rum, Slaves and Molasses: the Story of New England's Triangular Trade Hardcover – January 1, /5(1).

Describes the acquisition, transport, and fate of the Africans who fell victim to New England's slave trade with the West Indies in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Rum, slaves, and. Book review of "Rum, Slaves and Molasses" written by Clifford Lindsey Alderman The deWolf wharf in Bristol, Rhode Island, buzzed with activity on a day in The schooner Sukey was nearly ready to sail for West Africa.

Her route, crew and cargo of rum had been carefully recorded, but not the true nature of her trip. Rum, Slaves, And Molasses: The Story Of New England's Triangular Trade by Alderman C.L and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Rum, slaves, and molasses; the story of New England's triangular trade by Alderman, Clifford Lindsey.

Publication date Topics Slave-trade, Slave-trade, Slave trade Internet Archive Books. American Libraries. Uploaded by MerciG on Septem SIMILAR ITEMS (based on Pages: Here are corresponding rows from opposite sides of the trade book (ledger) showing the purchase of slaves (left) and the amount of rum paid for each (right), typically gallons per slave: Buying slaves: rows 26 and 27 of the left side of the Trade Book of the sloop Adventure, A sugar by-product, molasses, was distilled into rum and sent to Africa to purchase more slaves--this is the infamous Triangle Trade in the history Size: KB.

Yet, a century later, during colonial times, Newport had 22 distilleries turning out rum at top speed, writes Clifford Lindsey Alderman, in his book Rum, Slaves and Molasses. Although New Englanders certainly enjoyed the beverage, which they called Kill Devil or O-Be-Joyful, the quantities produced by the distillers far exceeded local demand.

New Englanders manufactured and shipped rum to the west coast of Africa in exchange for slaves. The slaves were taken on the 'Middle Passage' to the West Indies where they were sold for molasses and money. The molasses would be sent to New England to make rum and start the entire system of trade all over again.

sugar by-product, molasses, was distilled into rum and sent to Africa to purchase more slaves-- this is the infamous Triangle Trade in the history books. Sugar's most bitter legacy is that the labor of slaves fueled the enslavement of even more Size: KB. molasses from the plantation colonies of the Ca-ribbean to New England where colonists distilled it into rum.

Merchants then shipped this rum to Africa where it was exchanged for slaves, who were carried back to the Caribbean to produce more sugar.

Some Africans were brought back to New England. Because paid employees were often un. The interiors of slave ships have been revisited often enough recently, so that few of the particulars of the Sukey's voyage really come as a surprise.

But Alderman does excel in his discussion of the African side of the operation — showing how captains bargained with the white middlemen of ""factors"", how slaves were captured in intertribe warfare or by bribing corrupt witch doctors.

Buy Rum, Slaves and Molasses: the Story of New England's Triangular Trade by an (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : an. Molasses to Rum to Slaves On March 2,Congress passed an act prohibiting the importation of slaves after January 1,two hundred years ago.

Rhode Island played a big role in the slave trade, the “triangle trade” which brought tens of thousands of slaves in Newport slave ships before the American Revolution. Rum, slaves, and molasses; the story of New England's triangular trade. [Clifford Lindsey Alderman] -- Describes the acquisition, transport, and fate of the Africans who fell victim to New England's slave trade with the West Indies in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

By the late 17th century Caribbean rum was a thriving export trade and became part of the triangular trade where molasses was sent to New England to be distilled into rum. Rum was then shipped to West Africa and exchanged for slaves which in turn were sent to work on sugar plantations in the Caribbean.

Get this from a library. Rum, slaves and molasses: the story of New England's triangular trade. [Clifford Lindsey Alderman].

Molasses to Rum (): why. #10 Posted: 5/3/15 at pm "The fact is Routledge WINS his point and slavery is not condemned in the Declaration of Independence (an.

The song "Molasses to Rum" from the musical vividly describes this form of the triangular trade. Newport, Rhode Island was a major port involved in the colonial triangular slave trade.

Many significant Newport merchants and traders participated in the trade working closely with merchants and traders in the Caribbean and Charleston, South Carolina.

The slavery to his eyes runs in the circle, Molasses is produced by the colonies, rum is created by Britain, and slaves are produced by Africa. If the declaration remove slavery then his wealth, his life, and the colonies will all go down and become disoriented.

If you were a colonist at the time, this would make perfect sense and seem : Rusin.American Rum, African Consumers, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Preprint in New England but also from New Y ork, distilled W est Indian molasses into rum, traded the. () set to Sherman Edwards Molasses To Rum performed by John Cullum -It is fairly safe to say that Molasses To Rum is one of the only songs ever .