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Sunday, July 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Textile dyeing wastewaters found in the catalog.

Textile dyeing wastewaters

Roderick H. Horning

Textile dyeing wastewaters

characterization and treatment

by Roderick H. Horning

  • 315 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Washington, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dyes and dyeing -- Waste disposal.,
  • Sewage -- Purification.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Roderick H. Horning.
    SeriesEnvironmental protection technology series ; EPA-600/2-78-098, Research reporting series -- EPA-600/2-78-098.
    ContributionsUnited States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 292 p. :
    Number of Pages292
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17647385M

    Major pollutants in textile wastewaters are high-suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, heat, colour, acidity, and other soluble substances (Dae-Hee et al., ). The removal of colour from textile industry and dyestuff manufacturing industry wastewaters represents a major File Size: KB. Get this from a library! Microbial degradation of synthetic dyes in wastewaters. [Shree Nath Singh;] -- Today synthetic dyes are used extensively in the textile dyeing, paper printing, color photography, pharmaceuticals, food and drink, cosmetic and leather industries. As of now, over , different.

    The textile industry uses a variety of chemicals and dyes in the manufacturing of textiles. This lesson covers the variety of chemicals and dyes and why they are used. textile processes have been introduced providing unique methods to form yarns and textile substrates of widely varying structure and properties. This book addresses itself to the structure and properties of textile fibers, dyes, and finishes and the processes used in fiber, yarn, and substrate formation and in dyeing and finishing of these.

    However, if sodium sulphate in dyeing process and sulphuric acid in neutralization processes are used before a biological treatment, sulphate in the effluent exceeds mg/l. specifically treating wastewaters of textile industry. Seventeen of these treatment plants are biological, 83 are chemical, 14 are chemical and biological, and 2Cited by: Purchase Handbook of Textile and Industrial Dyeing - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN ,


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Textile dyeing wastewaters by Roderick H. Horning Download PDF EPUB FB2

A large portion of dyes is lost during the dyeing process and subsequently released in textile effluents while a smaller but not negligible amount is also released during clothes washing. The release of those colored wastewaters into the environment is a considerable source of nonaesthetic pollution and can also originate dangerous by-products.

Get this from a library. Textile dyeing wastewaters: characterization and treatment. [Roderick H Horning; United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.]. The coloration of fibers and fabrics through dyeing is an integral part of textile manufacturing.

This book discusses in detail several emerging topics on textile dyeing. "Textile Dyeing" will serve as an excellent addition to the libraries of both the novice and expert. Textile dyeing is a combined process of bleaching and coloring, which generates voluminous quantities of wastewaters and in turn causes serious environmental degradation.

Recently, new single or hybrid/combined processes have attracted much attention for treatment of textile and dyeing wastewaters. These processes which may be Textile dyeing wastewaters book as “state of the art technologies” are membrane separation processes, ultrasonic, photochemical and electrochemical processes.

Although the conventional methods still have been tried with some new materials such as, new Cited by: 9. Textile processing industry is considered as a water-intensive industry, as it uses high amounts of water for dyeing, finishing, and washing stages (Brik et al., ).

Textile wastewater has a variable and complex mixture of pollutants, such as inorganic compounds, polymers, organic products, and color. Textile wastewater can be treated using. Textile Wastewater Treatment Options: A Critical Review Libra JA, Sosath F () Combination of biological and chemical processes for the treatment of textile wastewater containing reactive dyes.

Sanjay K. Sharma is Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry, JECRC University, Jaipur, India, where he teaches engineering chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, spectroscopy and organic chemistry. He has published 16 books on chemistry and more than 60 research papers.

Sharma is also serving as Editor-in-Chief for the RASAYAN Journal of. Written by an international team of contributors and soon to be a standard in the field, Environmental Aspects of Textile Dyeing reviews current legislation and key technologies which make textile dyeing more efficient and environmentally friendly.

The book begins by detailing European and US legislation relating to textile : Hardcover. Synthetic Textile Dyes from Wastewaters 35 Shamik Chowdhury, Rajasekhar Balasubramanian and Papita Das Acronyms 35 Introduction 36 Basic Properties of Carbon Nanoadsorbents 37 Carbon Nanotubes 37 Graphene 40 Adsorpton of Textile Dyes by Carbon Nanoadsorbents 44 Adsorption by CNTs and Their Composites CHARACTERIZATION OF TEXTILE WASTEWATER J.

Hussain, The pH is also important in the dyeing step as the solubility of the dyes depends on it. The pH also changes with type of cloth processed. The source of nitrate in the wastewaters is the impurities present in the chemicals used in various processes.

Nitrate also increases due to the Cited by: Preface Environmental managers, engineers, and scientists who have had experience with industrial and hazardous waste management problems have noted the need for a handbook that is comprehensive in its scope, directly applicable to daily waste management problems of specific industries, and widely acceptable by practicing environmental professionals and educators.

EPA/ May TEXTILE DYEING WASTEWATERS: CHARACTERIZATION AND TREATMENT by Roderick H. Horning American Dye Manufacturers Institute One East 57th Street New York, New York Grant No. R I?'3' ^Iron;B3ntal Protect!., A«e»cy, Program Element No. 1BB!£* 1°n 5' Li*>i*»ry.

5?L) 6JV S. learfcern Str»*t, loom Chioaeo, U, I0«04 EPA. Textile Dyeing Wastewater Treatment Zongping Wang, Miaomiao Xue, Kai Huang and Zizheng Liu Huazhong University of Science and Technology China 1.

Introduction Textile industry can be classified into three categories viz., cotton, woolen, and synthetic fibers depending upon the used raw materials. The cotton textile industry is one of theFile Size: KB. Dictionary of Fiber and Textile Technology). Cross dyeing is used to achieve looks for which fiber or yarn dyeing would typically be required.

Although cross dyeing is typically used for piece dyeing, it can also be used for product dyeing. o A heather look is achieved by dyeing fiber blends with dye that has an affinity for only one of the fibers. Textile dyeing and textile wastewater treatment Advances In Textile Dyeing And Textile Wastewater Treatment Using Advanced Oxidation And Membrane Filtration Technologies: A Review Introduction.

The textile industry is a diverse sector in terms of production of raw materials, operating processes, product development, and equipment.

Dyeing contributes to most of the metals and almost all of the salts and color present in the overall textile effluent. For some dyeing processes likes cotton with reactive dyes, about 70% to 75% of the salts end up in the wastewater. Rinsing: Rinsing generally used. Textile effluents are among the most difficult-to-treat wastewaters, due to their considerable amount of recalcitrant and toxic substances.

Fungal biosorption is viewed as a valuable additional treatment for removing pollutants from textile wastewaters. In this study the efficiency of Cunninghamella elegans biomass in terms of contaminants, COD and toxicity reduction was tested against textile Cited by: Purchase Environmental Aspects of Textile Dyeing - 1st Edition.

Print Book & E-Book. ISBNThe book covers many of the key processes used in creating dyed and screen-printed fabrics using a range of synthetic dyes.

Included are recipes for cloth preparation, instructions for dyeing, printing, and fixing dyes, designing repeats, and preparing imagery and screens for by: 2. Dyeing process may be carried out in batch or in continuous mode.

It consists of a special solution containing dye and chemical for binding. The two factors influencing dyeing process are temperature and time controlling.

There are different methods applied by textile industries for adding colour to the by: 1. Read "Microbial Degradation of Synthetic Dyes in Wastewaters" by available from Rakuten Kobo. Today synthetic dyes are used extensively in the textile dyeing, paper printing, color photography, pharmaceuticals, foo Brand: Springer International Publishing.

Adsorption on fly-ash-based substrates is discussed as a possible alternative to the industrial processes used for the treatment of wastewaters resulted in the dyeing industry.

Three samples, containing four dyes and one conditioner, were collected from the dyeing and rinsing baths in a textile company. Adsorption on fly ash was comparatively discussed with adsorption and Cited by: